1/27/07

Max Beckman- 'On My Painting'


"My aim is always to get hold of the magic of reality and to transfer this reality into painting -- to make the invisible visible through reality. It may sound paradoxical, but it is, in fact, reality which forms the mystery of our existence.
What helps me most in this task is the penetration of space. Height, width, and depth are the three phenomena which I must transfer into one plane to form the abstract surface of the picture, and thus to protect myself from the infinity of space. My figures come and go, suggested by fortune or misfortune. I try to fix them divested of their apparent accidental quality."


"When spiritual, metaphysical, material, or immaterial events come into my life, I can only fix them by way of painting. It is not the subject which matters but the translation of the subject into the abstraction of the surface by means of painting. Therefore I hardly need to abstract things, for each object is unreal enough already, so unreal that I can only make it real by means of painting."

"In my opinion all important things in art since Ur of the Chaldees, since Tel Halaf and Crete, have always originated from the deepest feeling about the mystery of Being. Self-realization is the urge of all objective spirits. It is this Self for which I am searching in my life and in my art.
Art is creative for the sake of realization, not for amusement; for transfiguration, not for the sake of play. It is the quest of our Self that drives us along the eternal and never-ending journey we must all make."

"Color, as the strange and magnificent expression of the inscrutable spectrum of Eternity, is beautiful and important to me as a painter; I use it to enrich the canvas and to probe more deeply into the object. Color also decided, to a certain extent, my spiritual outlook, but it is subordinated to light and, above all, to the treatment of form. Too much emphasis on color at the expense of form and space would make a double manifestation of itself on the canvas, and this would verge on craft work. Pure colors and broken tones must be used together, because they are the complements of each other."

Excerpts from the lecture , given at the New Burlington Galleries, London, in 1938. (source: Herbert)

Max Beckman

4 comments:

Carlos Valdez sr said...

Beckman and Matisse are more polar opposites than Picasso and Matisse.

Beckman and Matisse have this in common- they both hid their incredible virtuosity from the viewer.

They had other fish to fry.

godoggo said...

I love all those post WWI German painters Beckmann, Kokoschka, Grosz, Dix. I was dragged screaming to see an exhibit of it at LACMA for a college class and fell in love for life.

MonksDream said...

It's funny, I always liked Beckmann and Grosz' portrayal of the grotesque nature of their time during the period between the two large wars. I never really saw the connection between them until I saw that second painting, David. On some level, Beckmann reminds me of a cross between Edvard Munch and Georg Grosz. He also somehow prefigured some of the great underground comic artists of our time like Crumb, Charles Burns, even Spiegleman.

Painters' comments on the creative process have always seemed a little bit less abstract than musicians, and their realization of something tangibly physical may be the reason. What I'm driving at, is that, with the plastic arts, one can physically touch the media. In other words, to paraphrase Eric Dolphy, "When you hear music, it's over and gone. You can never recapture it." Darn! I went to far down a tangent and thought myself into a hole. Any comments anyone?

MonksDream said...

It's funny, I always liked Beckmann and Grosz' portrayal of the grotesque nature of their time during the period between the two large wars. I never really saw the connection between them until I saw that second painting, David. On some level, Beckmann reminds me of a cross between Edvard Munch and Georg Grosz. He also somehow prefigured some of the great underground comic artists of our time like Crumb, Charles Burns, even Spiegleman.

Painters' comments on the creative process have always seemed a little bit less abstract than musicians, and their realization of something tangibly physical may be the reason. What I'm driving at, is that, with the plastic arts, one can physically touch the media. In other words, to paraphrase Eric Dolphy, "When you hear music, it's over and gone. You can never recapture it." Darn! I went to far down a tangent and thought myself into a hole. Any comments anyone?